ECHOTHERAPY
FOR VARICOSE VEINS

Do I have varicose veins?

Do you have aching legs or cramps? Are your legs often tired and heavy, or do you have itching, tingling sensations or swollen or tender areas in your legs? You may suffer from venous insufficiency. You are not alone. Varicose veins affect about 30 million people worldwide¹. Surgical stripping, radiofrequency ablation or laser ablation are common options. Echotherapy, the only non-invasive ablation therapy, now allows treatment without catheters, chemical injections or incisions.

¹L. H. Rasmussen et al., Randomized clinical trial comparing endovenous laser ablation, radiofrequency ablation, foam sclerotherapy and surgical stripping for great saphenous varicose veins, BJS, Volume 98, Issue 8, 2011

What is venous reflux?

Healthy leg veins have valves that open and close to assist the return of blood back to the heart. Varicose veins develop when those valves no longer function properly. As a result, the blood also flows in the wrong direction “downwards” and often pools in the lower part of the legs, increasing venous pressure. This is called venous reflux.

Venous reflux may cause symptoms like pain, swollen limb, heavy legs, skin changes or ulcers. It is a progressive disease and symptoms may worsen over time if left untreated. Your physician can easily determine whether you have venous reflux using a diagnostic ultrasound device.

Who is a candidate for varicose veins?

Venous reflux disorders are widespread diseases and there is often a family history. Connective tissue weakness favors venous diseases. As a result, women are twice as likely to be affected as men. During pregnancy, the risk increases because of hormone changes and elevated pressure in the abdomen. Lack of exercise, obesity and occupations involving a lot of standing activities are risk factors. Heavy lifting and some sports can also contribute to vein disease. Another cause is age: Like skin, veins become flaccid and expand over time.

Diagnosis
of Varicose Veins

When should I go to the doctor?

If you experience significant discomfort or tortuous veins become visible, you should consult a physician specializing in vascular disease.

Learn more +

This can be a surgeon, a phlebologist, an angiologist or a dermatologist. They can clarify the progress of the venous disease and, if necessary, suggest appropriate therapy to avoid complications and reduce discomfort.

What risks are associated
with varicose veins?

While varicose veins may be disturbing for aesthetic reasons if left untreated, they can develop into serious medical problems.

Learn more +

Due to poor functioning blood flow, skin and tissue changes may occur. In advanced disease stages, even leg ulcers can develop from venous reflux. Further possible complications include vein inflammations and thromboses.

How are varicose veins diagnosed?

A discussion with your doctor about your medical history, duration and the nature of your discomforts as well as an ultrasound scan, also called sonography, will clarify the nature and extent of the disease.

Learn more +

In most cases, a so called “Doppler” ultrasonography is used to determine the direction and flow speed of blood in the veins. The examination is a simple and painless way to identify possible reflux, e.g. blood flowing back to the lower part of the limb.

Are varicose veins painful?

In the preliminary stage, there may be no noticeable symptoms whatsoever.

Learn more +

However, patients with varicose veins in advanced stages often complain about heaviness, swelling, nocturnal cramps, itchy legs or skin changes.

Treatment 
& Effectiveness

How are varicose veins treated?

In most cases, compression with stockings or bandages is recommended in the early stages. In cases of advanced varicose vein disease, however, treatment of the defective vein is recommended in order to avoid further complications and resolve symptoms.

Learn more +

Possible treatment methods include classical varicose vein surgery (“stripping“) or a minimally invasive endoluminal or endovenous radiofrequency ablation or laser ablation. Now there is also echotherapy: the first and only non-invasive ablative treatment.

A venous ablation by radiofrequency or laser consists of inserting a catheter (long wire) into the vein. Although marketed as minimally invasive, these procedures are carried out in a sterile environment such as an operative theater. Because they are invasive, there is a risk of infection and a more or less long recovery period.¹

Sclerosant foam injection may be another alternative for you, but it often requires repeated injections of sclerosant chemicals, especially for larger veins. ²

Now there is also echotherapy as the first and only non-invasive ablative treatment: No catheters, no chemical injections and no incisions. This results in treatment without any scars and without risk of infection. Unlike surgical or minimally invasive vein treatments, echotherapy allows an immediate return to normal daily activities.

¹Minimally invasive techniques in the treatment of saphenous varicose veins, Tamar Nijsten et al.
²THE VEIN BOOK » J.J. Bergan, MD, FACS,- CHAPTER 21 – Sclerofoam for Treatment of Varicose Veins  J-J Guex

Treatment 
& Effectiveness

How are varicose veins treated?

In most cases, compression with stockings or bandages is recommended in the early stages. In cases of advanced varicose vein disease, however, treatment of the defective vein is recommended in order to avoid further complications and resolve symptoms.

Learn more +

Possible treatment methods include classical varicose vein surgery (“stripping“) or a minimally invasive endoluminal or endovenous radiofrequency ablation or laser ablation. Now there is also echotherapy as the first and only non-invasive ablative treatment.

A venous ablation by radiofrequency or laser consists of inserting a long catheter (like a long thin wire) into the vein. Although marketed as minimally invasive, these procedures are carried out in a sterile environment such as an operative theater. Because they are invasive, there is a risk of infection and a more or less long recovery period.¹

Sclerosant foam injection may be another alternative for you, but it often requires repeated injections of sclerosant chemicals, especially for larger veins. ²

Echotherapy is now also available as the first and only non-invasive ablative treatment: No catheters, no chemical injections and no incisions. This results in treatment without any scars and without risk of infection. Unlike surgical or minimally invasive vein treatments, echotherapy allows an immediate return to normal daily activities.

¹Minimally invasive techniques in the treatment of saphenous varicose veins, Tamar Nijsten et al.
²THE VEIN BOOK » J.J. Bergan, MD, FACS,- CHAPTER 21 – Sclerofoam for Treatment of Varicose Veins  J-J Guex

How does echotherapy work for varicose veins?

Imagine sunrays bundled together a magnifying glass to intensely target a single point. Echotherapy (HIFU – High-Intensity Focussed Ultrasound) works in a similar way but uses therapeutic ultrasound beams:

Ultrasonic waves are concentrated on the vein. As the thermal energy is delivered, the vein shrinks and is sealed/closed. In order to precisely control the position of the beam, an additional ultrasound device is used for monitoring.

Learn more +
Thanks to its non-invasive character echotherapy is optimal not only for the treatment of straight or tortuous veins (which are sometimes inacessible with a laser or radiofrequency catheter), but also for difficult to operate recurrences (i.e. newly formed varicose veins) after previous surgical on minimally invasive interventions, or if you have an elevated risk of hemorrhage. Echotherapy may also be an ideal option for the treatment of perforator veins, which connect the superficial system to the deep vein system – even in the presence of open ulcers.

How does echotherapy work for varicose veins?

Imagine sunrays bundled together a magnifying glass to intensely target a single point. Echotherapy (HIFU – High -Intensity Focussed Ultrasound) works in a similar way but uses therapeutic ultrasound beams:

Ultrasonic waves are concentrated on the vein. As the thermal energy is delivered, the vein shrinks and is sealed/closed. In order to precisely control the position of the beam, an additional ultrasound device is used for monitoring.

Learn more +
Thanks to its non-invasive character echotherapy is optimal not only for the treatment of straight or tortuous veins (which are sometimes inacessible with a laser or radiofrequency catheter), but also for difficult to operate recurrences (i.e. newly formed varicose veins) after previous surgical on minimally invasive interventions, or if you have an elevated risk of hemorrhage. Echotherapy may also be an ideal option for the treatment of perforator veins, which connect the superficial system to the deep vein system – even in the presence of open ulcers.

Echotherapy is the first ever high-precision non-invasive treatment for varicose veins. This is a medical breakthrough which will completely alter the way we treat varicose veins and venous issues!“

Professor Mark Whiteley MS FRCS (Gen) FCPhleb, Consultant Venous Surgeon and Consultant Phlebologist, Founder of the Whiteley Clinic, London (UK) 

You want to learn more about echotherapy? Let us help you.

Please simply fill out the contact form and we will get in touch with you by email or by phone.

Preferred call back time

I’m interested in Echotherapy for the treatment of

Data privacy

15 + 15 =